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Fish passage

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Collaborative science and conservation of wide-ranging species We know that fish don’t respect state and territory borders, yet often recovery and research efforts for native fish happen within jurisdictions. Whilst the work being done is important and valuable, imagine what can be achieved through collaboration. This month World Fish Migration Day 2024 is happening on
Fish stocking is an important tool used to supplement existing fisheries, create new ones and support populations of fish found in rivers, creeks and other waterways. Stocking may be done for the benefit of commercial, recreational or Cultural fishing, but may also be done for ecological conservation to restore or increase the population of threatened/endangered
Fish screens can be a useful tool for irrigators and lifesavers for fish — without fish screens over irrigation pumps, debris and wildlife can be sucked up into pipes that draw water from rivers. This causes fish and other creatures to become trapped and die, which in turn partially or fully blocks the pipes, forcing
Hume Dam photographed from above on a bright sunny day, with a small flow visible.
‘Flow hydrodynamics’, ‘turbulent kinetic energy’, ‘rheotactic behaviour’ - whilst these terms might not mean much to you, they are essential parts of native fish migration in the Murray-Darling Basin.    The Murray-Darling Basin is one of the most regulated river systems in the world, home to over 10,000 barriers preventing fish from migrating. These barriers
In response to the fragmentation of rivers and streams, fishways have become a popular method of mitigating the impacts of dams and weirs by helping to; facilitate fish movement and migration and create access to habitats. Habitat fragmentation poses a great risk to biodiversity, with riverine fish species particularly vulnerable to human development. Fishways, also
Barramundi (Lates calcarifer - also known as the Asian sea bass or the Giant sea perch) is a commonly angled, native Australian fish. Within Australia, Barramundi can be found along the northern coasts and inland rivers in Queensland, Western Australia, and Northern Territory. Looking globally, Barramundi have also left their mark as an introduced species